Amazon FBA Seller Accounts Being Hacked (And What You Should Do To Prevent It)!

So you might have seen this article floating around the web today: http://www.foxbusiness.com/markets/2017/04/10/amazon-coms-third-party-sellers-hit-by-hackers.html

Instead of having to sift through real and fake news, we have decided to give you a brief rundown of what is happening and how you can prevent it.


What’s Happening?

The login information for a group of Amazon seller accounts (this has happened in both Amazon Seller Central and Amazon Vendor Central) has been compromised (either from a previous or current hack). Hackers are using this login information to log onto seller accounts and do a few different things:

1 – They are changing the deposit account bank information and essentially stealing your Amazon seller deposit.

2 – They are doing #1, but they are also listing products that have a high margin, but don’t really exist (in order to create a higher payout before they steal it).

It’s pretty plain and simple. Scammers are taking advantage of sellers to make a quick buck.

Now you are most likely saying: This isn’t going to happen to me.

Funny thing about that. I have had two very close friends have this exact thing happen to them over the last 6 months. I worked with one of my friends to help him get back over $8,000 in stolen money (that was sent to a bank in Austin, TX). It causes a mess and you can take a few easy steps to prevent it from happening to you.

What You Need To Do.

There are actually three things you can do to help prevent this from happening to you.

1 – Change you password immediately.

I’m not a rocket scientist, but if you are still using the same password you have been using since 5th grade, it’s time to update it. This obviously goes for your Amazon account, but you should also change the password for your email accounts, and essentially any other account online. It might sound crazy, but you would be amazed what a hacker can do with simply having access to your Facebook account or email accounts.

If you can’t remember all of your passwords, use a service like 1Password (my personal favorite) or Last Pass to create and securely store your login information. This allows me to have extremely complex passwords without having to remember them all (or have them written in a file named “passwords” on my computer).

Some quick tips to increase the strength of your password:

Use lowercase, uppercase, numbers, and symbols in your password

Make sure it is over 10 characters

Do not use important dates in your life or common passwords like “password or qwerty”

Set a calendar reminder to update your password every 90 days

2 – Check your deposit account information right away.

After you change your password, you should go into your account and verify that your deposit information hasn’t changed.

Go over to account information (top right as shown below).

Then click “Deposit Methods”

Then click “view details”

Once you see your information, verify if it is correct.

If it is, you are good to move on to the next step. If it is not, you need to contact Amazon immediately.

3 – Turn on Two-Step Verification 

Two-step verification adds an extra level of security to your account. It only takes a few seconds to set up, but you will be happy you did.

Full instructions to set-up two-step verification can be found here: https://www.amazon.com/gp/help/customer/display.html?nodeId=201962420 


Now that you are armed with the information, take the steps needed today to secure your account. Don’t wait around until it is too late!

CW

One thought on “Amazon FBA Seller Accounts Being Hacked (And What You Should Do To Prevent It)!

  • April 10, 2017 at 2:00 pm
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    Great advice. I’ve had 2 step on for about a year now. Unfortunately when you call, about half the reps forget to ask you to verify your 2 step. But online, it’s critical. I agree with the hackers using the accounts to sell an item cheaply. I do AZ flips, buy from a lot of 3rd party sellers. Before it was easy to avoid the just launched sellers with low prices. Now they are hacking into older dormant legitimate accounts that have 100% feedback, but the last feedback (if you check) may be from 2000, 2006, etc with no current feedback. I’ve seen about 40 of these accounts over the last 2 weeks alone. Also, many of these hacked accounts have identical inventory with 200+ pages and similar low prices. Red flag.

    Reply

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