Tactical Arbitrage Mini Lessons – Filters: Part #1

In conjunction with the free training course (found here), I am going to be doing short mini lessons over different aspects of Tactical Arbitrage. As always, you can get your free trial of Tactical Arbitrage here.

See all of our FREE training material for Tactical Arbitrage here.


Mini Lesson – Filters: Part #1

Instead of trying to write one long tutorial on filters, we are going to break it down into bite sized pieces.

Before we go into the different things you can do with a filter, we should probably start with a question I know most of you have…

What in the world is a filter?!?!

In plain english, a filter is a way for us to sort out the deals we would like to see. It essentially our instructions to the software to tell it what we want it to find.

A real world example would be that of a coffee filter. We use it (the filter) to separate the coffee (the stuff we want) from the coffee grounds (the stuff we don’t want).

Another example could be a bouncer at a club. Their job is to let the people we like in and keep the others out.

Filters in Tactical Arbitrage do the exact same thing.

They filter out the bad product leads and provide us with the ones we want.

Now all we have to do is tell the software what we define as a good lead.

These qualities (or parameters) are the way the software sorts the product leads.

Does that make sense? If not, leave a comment below and I can explain a little further.

To start the sorting process, we need to tell Tactical Arbitrage how we want it to sort our leads (I’m going to show these in increments of 5).

So let’s start with a little screenshot:

 

These are the first five parameters we can set in a filter.

#1 is actually a modifying filter.  That means it is going to modify the price of an item in order to help us do the calculations needed. It is essentially doing math for us so we don’t have to do it later.

The store price reduction boxes are the place you can put things such as a percentage off (from sites like RetailMeNot), cash back percentages (from sites like Ebates), or even the percentage you save from discounted gift cards (from sites like Raise).

All you have to do is type in the percentages in the boxes and BOOM. Tactical Arbitrage will do the rest for you and these discounts will be accounted for on your “Data” screen.

#2 is also a modifying filter. It is used to account for the cost of sales tax if you are not using your tax exempt privileges on certain stores. Simply type in the sales tax percentage for your state (if you are going to be charged sales tax) and Tactical Arbitrage will take care of the rest.

#3 is a parameter that we all use when we are in a retail store scanning. We can tell Tactical Arbitrage the following:

If the rank of an item is over XXXX, then please do not show that item to me.

You just simply type a rank into the box and Tactical Arbitrage will do the rest.

#4 is a parameter that can help you determine the number of sellers on a listing. Some people don’t like to have over a certain number of sellers on a listing, so you can use Tactical Arbitrage to sort like this:

If the listing has more than XXX sellers on it, please do not show it to me.

You just simply type that number into the box and Tactical Arbitrage will do the rest.

#5 is a parameter that can only be used on Walmart.com. It will remove the 3rd party sellers from the results and only provide you with the results when Walmart is selling the product directly.


See all of our FREE training material for Tactical Arbitrage here.

As always, you can get your free trial of Tactical Arbitrage here.

3 thoughts on “Tactical Arbitrage Mini Lessons – Filters: Part #1

  • January 29, 2017 at 8:37 am
    Permalink

    For Filter# 1, is the order of entry important? For example, Store sales%, Cash Back % and discounted gift cards? or is the order irrelevant?

    Reply
    • January 30, 2017 at 1:56 pm
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      Let me confirm on Alex with this one. I believe it does matter, but I want to confirm.

      Reply

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